Good Morning Cactus

May all be happy.
May all be healthy and safe.
May all have enough.
May all be at peace.

This time I didn’t write “beings” because I realized that I want to include mountains and rivers.

I walked by my cactus friend and saw that they were doing well and are even taller than when I saw them in the summer:
IMG 7892
I was in a store to investigate and instigate heating/cooling units for my apartment, since it has neither. While there, I saw this little growing pod. This would have looked sooooo futuristic twenty years ago!
IMG 7893
I also met a person with a beautiful family name: Vagarinho
It means Little Wanderer in Portuguese.
Same root as Vagrant, which also comes from the Latin word vagari, meaning to wander.

We are all Vagarinhos. :-)

On my way home I walked by a school and saw this on the wall:
IMG 7894
“Every person is a World”

Wish

This morning I was thinking about my wishes and hopes for the new year when I remembered a saying I heard many years ago. That saying is from India, I learned, and goes like this:

A healthy person has 10,000 wishes, a sick person only one.

There must be many millions of people who all have the same wish. May many of them come true.

When I think of the people who have only one wish it is only logical to also think of other beings who wish to survive, species on the verge of extinction, forests getting wiped out for cattle ranches, and so on.

May all beings be safe

May all beings be healthy

May all beings be happy

May all beings be free

Digital Dharma in Manhattan

December 10th:
Digital Dharma preview in New York. An intimate evening of art, music and ispiration.

Click here for more info.

I donated some of my photos to the movie and will perform solo with a new slideshow of my Tibet photos.

Reading

I am already on the third installment of John Burdett’s Bangkok series, a book called Bangkok Haunts – I am reading the Kindle version on the free Kindle for iPhone application. In what seems to me typical Thai fashion the book is able to move effortlessly between violence, sex and spirituality. Here is a snippet from a conversation between the main character of the book, a cop in Krung Thep, and a monk:

Saved? There is nothing to save, my friend. You cannot caste yourself into the Unknowable in the hope that gesture will buy you salvation – you have to jump for the hell of it. In a nirvanic universe there can be no salvation because we are never really lost – or found. The choice is simply between nirvana and ignorance. That is the adult truh the Buddha urges upon us. We are the sum of our burning. No burning, no being.

When I traveled in Asia for a year, a long time ago, I was constantly amazed and delighted by the ability of so many people (((seemed like everybody was able to do that))) to switch from the mundane to the spiritual and back in no time at all. Spirituality is not reserved for a fixed hour per week, but is constantly present and referenced.