Wednesday in Santa Fe

02009-11-11 | Uncategorized | 2 comments

Today: Rehearsal. Then I’ll finish packing for Japan.

Been listening to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra with Karajan conducting. 1977. I have read that some cynics claim he recorded the symphony at such brisk tempi because the record company needed to fit it on an LP. But an LP can’t deliver 66 minutes of music anyway and this recording was made 7 years before CDs were available. I just think the orchestra, in true Beethoven spirit, wanted to rock the house… and THIS DOES! I love the second movement. From wikipedia:

The second movement, a scherzo, is also in D minor, with the opening theme bearing a passing resemblance to the opening theme of the first movement, a pattern also found in the Hammerklavier piano sonata, written a few years earlier. It uses propulsive rhythms and a timpani solo.

It uses propulsive rhythms and a timpani solo. It’s rock and roll, two hundred years ago.

Jon writes:

I looked at the score and yes, the (((second))) movement is written as a very fast 3/4 (triple time). For me, it’s easier to hear it in a slower 4/4. You heard it that way too, right? (((Yes, I did)))
So, when the timpani sound like they are playing rock n roll backbeats- it is written as the downbeat of every second measure of three. Or- when the pulse sounds like Trip-a-let, Trip-a-let, Trip-a-let, Trip-a-let, (eighth note triplets in the slower 4/4) it is written 123, 123, 123, 123 (fast 3/4) The measure are flying by!

I don’t know what a Scherzi was supposed to sound like before this, but if LVB wanted to have the section effectively be in 4/4, he did it in such a way as to still technically be in 3/4… Hope this isn’t confusing- I’ll show you the score tomorrow.

From wikipedia:

Beethoven had been criticised before for failing to adhere to standard form for his compositions. He used this movement to answer his critics. Normally, Scherzi are written in triple time. Beethoven wrote this piece in triple time, but it is punctuated in a way that, when coupled with the speed of the metre, makes it sound as though it is in quadruple time.

Good old Ludwig Van… like I said – Rock & Roll!

One night last week:

That might make a nice large-scale painting. Some of the reflections already look like brush-strokes.

How to view that video and over 11,000 photos (and download them) on Flickr

The Fun Theory:

Thanks Nancy.

More about Fun Theory here.

2 Comments

  1. Brenda

    Like that Fun Theory! Wow! Great way to spread Public Art in my town. Yes, thanks soooooooooooooooo much for the idea!
    Hope you have a wonderful time in Toyko! Cause this little Hillbilly is looking forward to enjoying your diary entries, photo’s and ALL THAT GOOD OTTMAR STUFF! You have FUN!!!! You Hear!

    Reply
  2. Max

    If the environmental crowd tried this approach, they’d probably get more people to buy in to it!

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Archives

Images

Concert Dates

Thu, Oct 27 2022 in Natick, MA
@ Natick Center for Arts

Fri, Oct 28 2022 in Rockport, MA
@ Shalin Liu Performance Center

Sat, Oct 29 2022 in Norwalk, CT
@ Wall Street Theater

Sun, Oct 30 2022 in Newark, NJ
@ Victoria Theater @ NJPAC

Wed, Nov 2 2022 in Richmond, VA
@ Tin Pan

Thu, Nov 3 2022 in Annapolis, MD
@ Ramshead