We Still Care. Don’t We?

02007-10-25 | Uncategorized | 5 comments

Somewhere Deep Down, We Still Care. Don’t We?
I think people are becoming desensitized to violence and suffering at a much earlier age these days. And I’m pretty sure it has a lot do with the way we’ve accepted violence, and even glorified it, in popular culture. In simple terms, Quentin Tarantino has a lot to answer for.

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5 Comments

  1. Dawn

    “When the suffering is right in front of me, it’s different.”

    The average person doesn’t know what it’s like to witness something very terrible. Finding other people like me is my only solace. I have my bouts of depression but I remind myself of all the goodness out there too, like this blog! Except for the evening news, I limit what I watch on TV.

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  2. Victor

    Without meaning or beauty in life we look for intensity to feel alive. Violence has a very heightened sense for the senses and its not maybe the new way of entertainment for people who don’t develop themselves to appreciate beauty. As Carl Young says “Man was created for the stars, but lives in the swamp” If culture will pay for violence that that is what it will bread and live on. I don’t think things will change unless peoples attitudes and desires change. IMHO

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  3. Carl Cook

    I think it is a function of radius and attitude. As a distant 3rd person observer (TV, News, Movies,…), we are insensitive. If we witness it 1st hand happening to another, it is potent. If it happens to us, it is striking. Continuing off the scale, all too often if some people get a hang-nail they want emergency treatment and will tell the world endlessly about their great suffering. Clearly they don’t know suffering.

    I think it has a lot to do with attitude, too. I watched a California fire victim on CNN today, standing within the charred foundation of her house, saying that fire is, in many ways, considered cleansing and that she actually looks forward to a fresh start.

    Now THAT is a positive attitude amidst what otherwise would be considered an opportunity for suffering.

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  4. eric

    I don’t know enough about other countries to speak on behalf of our species but I can say that as Americans we lack space. Space in the context of mind space. Our capitalistic society is based on addictions, images, and exploitation. These have now become our foundation and hence the cause of our demise. We do have a lot of good people in our country and the unfortunate part to all of this is that they are being overlooked. Why are they being overlooked? I’m not sure, maybe is has something to do with the people who control the media, maybe it might have something to do with the people who govern, maybe it might have something to do with us. I admit to my own fault that sometimes I buy into it. I buy into to not caring because it’s too hard. Too much of an effort is given when I can go watch T.V., play video games, or do drugs or whatever. It’s too easy for me not to care. There’s no enforcement for what’s wrong and no reward for what’s right.

    I think George Lucas hit it pretty right on with his Light and Dark side of the Force. Remember throughout the series that Yoda would always practice to maintain the balance between Good and Evil. Why, because you can’t have one without the other. I think our society has lost touch with this. Maybe as individuals we get this but collectively it doesn’t seem to be present.

    To leave this on a positive note, I do believe that we humans (including Americans) have the capacity to help this. There are people doing great things and more of the news should be focused on them. Not the million and one murders. Maybe at one time the news served a purpose for that but now it’s doing more harm than good.

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  5. eddie

    it is not hard to dream, but hard to see humanity without violence…did that make sense?

    Reply

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