Monday in Santa Fe

02010-03-23 | Music, Photos | 5 comments

Future Perfect » Beer Emotions
Cherry blossom season is almost upon us and with it, an abundance of beer advertising. Poster showing a full range of emotion of an archetypal salariman beer consumer – featuring the actor Nishida Toshiyuki.

Click here for photographs.
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The second verse of the last piece on the new album. The piece is called Garden at Dusk. Added extra-reverb to the very last note of the verse… those are the little things I am working on now. Little surprises you may hear, or not even notice, but that make repeated listening more fun.
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Weekend project: connect 75 pieces of Algue, 50 middle green and 25 light green, to serve as a room devider…



Also moved several plants to larger pots. One of them was a large mothers-in-law plant AKA snake plant AKA tiger’s tail. I cut it in half and put each half in a larger pot. Snake plants are very hardy and usually don’t mind getting halved like that. I heard they give off oxygen at night, which is unusual because it means the plant must store oxygen somewhere. Looks much happier now. I am planning on getting more indoor plants this Spring, large ones.

5 Comments

  1. Matt Callahan

    That is fantastic.

    Reply
  2. yumi

    1:39, especially sweet.

    Reply
  3. Boris

    Very promising.

    Reply
  4. Adam Solomon

    Your trémolo never fails to amaze :) It’s just ridiculous how fast it goes while still being clean. You play a three finger classical-style trémolo, right?

    Reply
  5. Ottmar

    Yes, I suppose it is a standard classical tremolo. A, M, I, A, M, I etc.
    I was surprised when I first heard a Flamenco tremolo, because thought that the guitarist simply could not play a tremolo very well. Then I heard that they WANT a tremolo to sound like a galloping horse. Well, it sounds like that indeed, but I still don’t like it. I want a tremolo to sound as effortless as a long note on a violin or a buzz-roll on a snare and not clop-di-clop-di-clop. But that’s just my personal taste.

    When I was about fourteen, fifteen, I would spend hours working on the tremolo every day – while reading, while watching TV. It drove my family crazy.

    I just did a search because I wanted to find information about the classical tremolo and found this:
    http://www.guitarramagazine.com/goodtremolo
    That looks like what I am doing, although I don’t think I stop the tremolo for the P. The three fingers keep going.

    Reply

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